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Listen NowTitleFile NumberSubjectsRecording DateAlt TitleGenresInstrumentsCitiesStateSettingEditor NoteTechnical NoteOnline Resources
Country Blues4769A18-30-1941,

Followed by interview with Alan Lomax about the song, Robert Johnson, Son House, his tunings, style, and musicianship.

I Be's Troubled4769A28/30/1941,

Followed by interview with Alan Lomax about the song, Robert Johnson, Son House, his tunings, style, and musicianship.

Country Blues (duplicate)4770A18-30-1941,

Duplicate (from preservation reel) of 4769A1. Followed by interview with Alan Lomax about the song, Robert Johnson, Son House, his tunings, style, and musicianship.

I Be's Troubled (duplicate)4770A28/30/1941,

Duplicate (from preservation reel) of 4769A2. Followed by interview with John Work about the song’s composition and his repertoire playing for dances.

Levee Camp Blues (#1)4780A2, , , 9-3-1941, , ,

An archival source for both sides of this disc was unavailable at the time of cataloging (Spring 2018). The Library of Congress’ disc concordance states that no preservation reel was made when the rest of the collection was transferred (1968), which suggests the disc was either damaged or missing. However, the fact that the recordings have been commercially issued (see Biograph’s “The Original Library of Congress Sessions From Field Recordings 1941-1942”) argues that the disc or at least a tape transfer does survive and is simply currently (still) missing. The audio in this catalog, then, is that issued on the Biograph CD.

Government Fleet Blues4780B1, , , 9-3-1941, , ,

An archival source for both sides of this disc was unavailable at the time of cataloging (Spring 2018). The Library of Congress’ disc concordance states that no preservation reel was made when the rest of the collection was transferred (1968), which suggests the disc was either damaged or missing. However, the fact that the recordings have been commercially issued (see Biograph’s “The Original Library of Congress Sessions From Field Recordings 1941-1942”) argues that the disc or at least a tape transfer does survive and is simply currently (still) missing. The audio in this catalog, then, is that issued on the Biograph CD.

Walking Blues4780B2, , , 9-3-1941, , ,

An archival source for both sides of this disc was unavailable at the time of cataloging (Spring 2018). The Library of Congress’ disc concordance states that no preservation reel was made when the rest of the collection was transferred (1968), which suggests the disc was either damaged or missing. However, the fact that the recordings have been commercially issued (see Biograph’s “The Original Library of Congress Sessions From Field Recordings 1941-1942”) argues that the disc or at least a tape transfer does survive and is simply currently (still) missing. The audio in this catalog, then, is that issued on the Biograph CD.

Shetland Pony Blues4781A19/3/1941,
Fo' Clock Blues4781A2, , 9-3-1941, ,
Make Me A Pallet On the Floor4781A39-3-1941,
Delta Blues4781B2, 9-3-1941, ,
Going to Fishing4781B3, , 9-3-1941, , ,
Uncle Sam Done Called (fragment)4782A1, , 9-3-1941, , ,

Identified as a microphone test in AFS catalog.

Uncle Sam Done Called4782A2, , 9-3-1941, , ,

Remaining side is a brief instrumental by E.C. Ball (recorded in Virginia) followed by empty disc.

Kokomo Blues6109A2, , , , , 7-14-1942, , , , ,

Lomax identified Carroll’s bass as a “tin-can bull-fiddle.” “Kokomo” was misheard/misidentified as “Kohoma” on AFS card.

Going Away to Make It Lonesome Here6109B1, , , , , 7-14-1942, , , , , ,

Lomax identified Carroll’s bass as a “tin-can bull-fiddle.” Followed by demonstration of the band’s instruments.

Four O'Clock Flower Blues6605A1, 7-16-1942, ,

Followed by Lomax interview with Blackwell about his compositions.

Audio drop-out at 2:58 (releases of this performance have edited out the compromised phrase).

Junior, A Jap Girl's Christmas for His Santa Claus6605B7-16-1942, ,

“Junior” transcribed as “Junion” on AFS card. This oft-mangled title, to quote Chris Smith, “result[s] from a misunderstanding of Blackwell’s lyric, which refers to sending Junior ‘a Jap’s skull’ [at] Christmas for his Santa Claus [gift].”

Performance followed by blank disc.

Mississippi Blues6606A17-16-1942, ,
East St. Louis Blues6606A27-16-1942, ,
Ragged and Dirty6606A3, 7-16-1942, ,
Song fragment6606B27-17-1942,

Alternately identified as “Sun Goin’ Down,” “I Ain’t Goin’ to Cry No More,” and “Special Rider” on various releases and (in the case of the latter) Blues and Gospel Recordings.

Special Rider Blues6606B37-17-1942,

Followed by brief discussion of song, which House said he learned in 1928 from Willie Williams in Matson, Miss., and by the tuning (Spanish A).

Low Down Dirty Dog Blues6607A17-17-1942,
Depot Blues6607A27-17-1942,

Followed by demonstration of tuning and chords, and lyric improvisation.

Walking Blues6607B37-17-1942Death Letter Blues,

In the Lomax interview that follows, House discusses his experience recording for the Paramount company in 1930, and his affiliation with the Delta Big Four and Charley Patton. He also identifies this song as “Walking Blues,” although what was issued on Paramount under that name is a different song. This performance would be identified on 1960s releases as “Death Letter (Blues).”

County Farm Blues6608A17-17-1942,

Brief interview with Lomax follows.

The Pony Blues6608A27-17-1942,

Followed by tuning demonstration; House says he learned the tuning from Willie Brown.

The Jinx Blues (#1)6608A37-17-1942,
The Jinx Blues (#2)6608B17-17-1942,
Sitting On Top of the World6609B37-19-1942, ,

Preceded with questions from Lewis Jones about the secular songs in his repertoire (those he performs while busking), and followed by commentary on Blind Sid Hemphill, from whom he learned the song, and how to find him. Lomax and Jones would visit him several days later.

Minglewood Blues6609B47-19-1942, , ,

Erroneously identified on AFS card as “Manuwat Blues.”

Spread My Raincoat Down6610A27-20-1942,

Edwards tells Lomax this is the first song he learned.

You Got To Roll (I)6610B27-20-1942,

Identified by Lomax as a “chain gang song.”

You Got To Roll (II)6610B37-20-1942, ,

Followed by discussion of song’s origins and some of the lyrics, including Lomax asking Edwards why he changed the lyrics for the recording from “white folks” to “baby.” Also about his musician father and his repertoire.

Stagolee6610B47-20-1942, , ,

A song (and in a style) learned from his father.

Stagolee6610B47-20-1942, , ,

A song (and in a style) learned from his father.

Just A Spoonful6610B57-20-1942, , ,

A song (and in a style) learned from his father.

Worried Life Blues6612A17-20-1942,

Followed by discussion of composing vs. improvising verses.

Water Coast Blues6612A27-20-1942,

Preceded by several false starts and much blank disc.

The Army Blues6612B17-20-1942, ,

Followed by discussion of the song, which he had written “about three weeks ago,” and the war.

Test (Unidentified blues)6615B17-22-1942, , , ,

Identified as “test” on AFS card. Aural evidence suggests this could be Edwards’ performance that appears in Lomax’s Clarksdale film footage.

Marred by intense speed fluctuations.

Wind Howlin' Blues6615B27-22-1942, ,

Identified by Lomax as the Delta Tourist Camp (suggested by Chris Smith to be the Delta Tourist Courts • 1600 N. State St. in Clarksdale)

Roamin' and Ramblin Blues6615B37-22-1942, , , ,

Preceded by Lomax announcement of “a man who’s been all over the country, he’s a very experienced musician, same age as I am — 27 years old….”

Ramblin' Kid Blues (fragment)6628A1, , , 7-24-1942, , ,

Fragmentary machine/microphone test.

Ramblin' Kid Blues (fragment)6628A6, , , 7-24-1942, , ,
Rosalie6628A7, , , 7-24-1942Rosa Lee, , ,
Joe Turner Blues6628A8, , , 7-24-1942, , ,

With spoken interjections by the rest of the group.

Pearlie May Blues6628B1, , , 7-24-1942, , ,
Take A Walk With Me6628B2, 7-24-1942,
Burr Clover Blues6628B3, 7-24-1942,

Discussion about composition follows. Morganfield says he wrote it in ’40.

I Be Bound to Write to You (#1)6629A3, 7-24-1942,
I Be Bound to Write to You (#2)6629A4, 7-24-1942,
You Gonna Miss Me When I'm Gone6629A57-24-1942,
Joe Turner Blues (false start)6629B5, 7-24-1942, ,
Joe Turner Blues6629B6, 7-24-1942, ,
Worried Life Blues6645B2, 7-28-1942,
Fo' Day Blues/Interview6662A1, 7-28-1942, , ,

Interview about Clarksdale, dance halls, local piano players, and this tune takes place while Jones plays. (Despite Alan’s introduction of the date being “the 26th or 27th,” it was the 28th.)

Corrina, Corrina/Careless Love/Interview6663B1, 7-28-1942, ,

Interspersed with discussion of early blues.

Country Blues6666B27-30-1942, http://Source audio from LWO/
You Gonna Miss Me When I'm Dead and Gone6667A17-30-1942, http://Source audio from LWO/
Levee Camp Blues (#1)6667A27-30-1942, http://Source audio from LWO/
Interview about Levee Camp Blues (#1)6667A3, 7-30-1942,
Levee Camp Blues (#2)6667B17-30-1942,

Followed by Lomax interview about Forrest Jones’ levee camp in Arkansas.

32-206667B2, 7-30-1942,

“Johnny”‘s is otherwise unidentified.