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Listen NowTitleFile NumberSubjectsRecording DateAlt TitleGenresInstrumentsCitiesCountiesStateSettingEditor NoteTechnical NoteOnline Resources
I'm So Glad I Got My Religion In Time4764A18-29/30-1941, , ,

Levels inconsistent; some drop-outs due to poor disc condition.

 

I'll Be Waiting Up There4764A28-29/30-1941, , ,
Oh, Freedom!4764A38-29/30-1941, , ,
Oh, Freedom!4764A38-29/30-1941, , ,
Daniel4764A48-29/30-1941, , ,

Levels inconsistent; some drop-outs due to poor disc condition.

Announcements and collection4764B8-29/30 1941, , , ,

Disc starts with the singing of “I’m So Glad (I Done Got Over).” Upcoming events and collections are announced, including an announcement of Mrs. Lomax’s donation of $2, with applause following.

Rock, Daniel (#1)4765A1, , , , , , , , , , 8-29/30-1941, , ,

Rev. Savage dedicates the performance to Rev. Dr. Lowell [?], pastor of the church. Followed by discussion between Lomax and Rev. Savage about song’s context and meaning. Rev. Savage says he learned the song from his grandmother, who sang it in slavery-times. (Lomax erroneously identifies Savage as Henry Joiner in his notebook.)

Hallelu, Hallelu4765A2, 8-29/30-1941, , ,

Followed by Lomax interview with Annie Anderson, one of the songleaders, about song’s context and meaning and “getting happy” at meetings. Rev. Savage discusses the theological relevance of the sun and stars to conversation.

Testimony on conversion experience4765B18-29/30-1941,
This Is My Burying Ground4765B2, , , , , , , , , , 8-29/30-1941, , ,
Let Me Ride4765B3, , , , , , , , , , 8-29/30-1941, , ,

Rev. Savage introduces himself (he’s visiting from Hollandale, Mississippi.)

Samson4766A1, , , , , , , , , , 8-29/30-1941If I Had My Way, I'd Tear the Building Down, , ,

Identified as “Samson” on AFS card. Personnel listed are those notated by Lomax; not all of them can be confirmed to perform on this band.

O David4766A2, , , , , , , , , , 8-29/30-1941Little David, Play On Your Harp, , ,

Identified as “O David” on AFS card.

I Know the Lord Will Fix A Way for Me4766A3, , , , , , , , , , 8-29/30-1941, , ,

Led by Hester Jones. Preceded by discussion of where she learned the song. Personnel listed are those notated by Lomax; not all of them can be confirmed to perform on this band.

I'm No Way Worried (Glory Hallelujah)4766A4, , , , , , , , , 8-29/30-1941, , ,

Joiner sings lead and introduces the song as one she learned from her mother

I Couldn't Hear Nobody Pray4766B1, , , , , , , , , , 8-29/30-1941, , ,

Tape (not disc) transfer, as can be heard by speeding up to pitch at top.

Calvary4766B2, , , , , , , , , , 8-29/30-1941, , ,

Followed by discussion of song by Rev. Savage and Henry Joiner. Personnel listed are those notated by Lomax; not all of them can be confirmed to perform on this band.

He Rose, He Rose4766B3, , , , , , , , , , 8-29/30-1941, , ,

Lomax requests this song at the end of the preceding band. Personnel listed are those notated by Lomax; not all of them can be confirmed to perform on this band.

Moaning4767A1, , , , , , , , , , 8-29/30-1941, , ,

Identified as such on AFS card. Personnel listed are those notated by Lomax; not all of them can be confirmed to perform on this band.

I'm Goin' to Stay On the Battlefield Till I Die4767A2, , , , , , , , , , 8-29/30-1941, ,

Personnel listed are those notated by Lomax; not all of them can be confirmed to perform on this band.

Note that 4767B is unrelated to the Coahoma sessions.

Country Blues4769A18-30-1941,

Followed by interview with Alan Lomax about the song, Robert Johnson, Son House, his tunings, style, and musicianship.

I Be's Troubled4769A28/30/1941,

Followed by interview with Alan Lomax about the song, Robert Johnson, Son House, his tunings, style, and musicianship.

Country Blues (duplicate)4770A18-30-1941,

Duplicate (from preservation reel) of 4769A1. Followed by interview with Alan Lomax about the song, Robert Johnson, Son House, his tunings, style, and musicianship.

I Be's Troubled (duplicate)4770A28/30/1941,

Duplicate (from preservation reel) of 4769A2. Followed by interview with John Work about the song’s composition and his repertoire playing for dances.

I'm A Soldier (In the Army of the Lord) / Ain't But One Way to Glory4774A, , , , , 8-31-1941, , , , , ,

Performances interspersed with testimony. Personnel listed are those notated by Lomax or heard referred to on the recordings.

Worship service (testimonials)4775A1, , , , , 8/31/1941, , ,

Personnel listed are those notated by Lomax or heard referred to on the recordings.

I'm Gonna Lift Up A Standard for My King4775A2, , , , , 8-31-1941, , , , ,

Personnel listed are those notated by Lomax or heard referred to on the recordings.

Build Up A Building for the Lord / One Day, Lord (I'll Give Up This World and Follow You) / Testimonials / He Died for Me4775B, , , , , 8-31-1941, , , , , ,

Performance followed by testimonials, including some instances of speech-in-tongues and “getting happy.” (These bands are identified as “Sermon and singing” on AFS cards.) Personnel listed are those notated by Lomax or heard referred to on the recordings.

Worship service (testimonials and prayers) / Amen Amen Amen4776A, , , , , 8/31/1941, , , , , ,

Performance of “Amen Amen Amen” is preceded by an introduction of “Mother Vickson” from Shelby, Miss., with both testimonials and prayers before and after. Band is identified simply as “Singing” on AFS card. Personnel listed are those notated by Lomax or heard referred to on the recordings.

Worship service (preaching and Bible reading)4776B, , , , , 8/31/1941, , , ,

Band is identified simply as “Singing” on AFS card. Personnel listed are those notated by Lomax or heard referred to on the recordings.

Opening announcement6604A87-11-1942

The minister announces the visitors and makes other brief remarks on the musical program that will take place.

I Love the Lord, He Heard My Cry6604B17-11-1942,

Identified on AFS card as “Dr. Watts hymn.”

Prayer6604B2, 7-11-1942

Congregation picks up singing over the minister’s prayer.

Announcement6604B37-11-1942
I'll Fly Away6604B47-11-1942, ,
Use Me, My Lord, Use Me6604B57-11-1942,
Song fragment6606B27-17-1942,

Alternately identified as “Sun Goin’ Down,” “I Ain’t Goin’ to Cry No More,” and “Special Rider” on various releases and (in the case of the latter) Blues and Gospel Recordings.

Special Rider Blues6606B37-17-1942,

Followed by brief discussion of song, which House said he learned in 1928 from Willie Williams in Matson, Miss., and by the tuning (Spanish A).

Low Down Dirty Dog Blues6607A17-17-1942,
Depot Blues6607A27-17-1942,

Followed by demonstration of tuning and chords, and lyric improvisation.

American Defense6607B17-17-1942, ,

Followed by discussion and tuning demonstration. House says he made the song up three months earlier.

Am I Right Or Wrong6607B27-17-1942,
Walking Blues6607B37-17-1942Death Letter Blues,

In the Lomax interview that follows, House discusses his experience recording for the Paramount company in 1930, and his affiliation with the Delta Big Four and Charley Patton. He also identifies this song as “Walking Blues,” although what was issued on Paramount under that name is a different song. This performance would be identified on 1960s releases as “Death Letter (Blues).”

County Farm Blues6608A17-17-1942,

Brief interview with Lomax follows.

The Pony Blues6608A27-17-1942,

Followed by tuning demonstration; House says he learned the tuning from Willie Brown.

The Jinx Blues (#1)6608A37-17-1942,
The Jinx Blues (#2)6608B17-17-1942,
Meet Me In Jerusalem6608B27-19-1942,

Followed by discussion of song.

When I Lay My Burden Down6608B37-19-1942,

Followed by discussion of song and text.

Sweet Lamb of God6609A17-19-1942, ,

Followed by discussion of song.

Preacher Let Your Heart Catch On Fire6609A27-19-1942, ,

Followed by discussion of song and having the Holy Ghost in his heart.

In New Jerusalem6609A37-19-1942, ,
In New Jerusalem6609A47-19-1942, ,
Traveling On6609A57-19-1942, ,
The Buzzard Eats the Rabbit6609B17-19-1942,
The Hawk and the Buzzard6609B27-19-1942,
Sitting On Top of the World6609B37-19-1942, ,

Preceded with questions from Lewis Jones about the secular songs in his repertoire (those he performs while busking), and followed by commentary on Blind Sid Hemphill, from whom he learned the song, and how to find him. Lomax and Jones would visit him several days later.

Minglewood Blues6609B47-19-1942, , ,

Erroneously identified on AFS card as “Manuwat Blues.”

Interview about childrens' games6610A1, 7-20-1942

Interview with Edwards about ring games he played as a child.

Marred by noise in the right channel at 2:17.

Spread My Raincoat Down6610A27-20-1942,

Edwards tells Lomax this is the first song he learned.

Interview about Spread My Raincoat Down and the meaning and origins of the blues6610B1, 7-20-1942

Discussion of the preceding “plantation song,” which Edwards learned as a boy in Shaw, Miss.; what the blues “are all about”; and the first time he had the blues.

You Got To Roll (I)6610B27-20-1942,

Identified by Lomax as a “chain gang song.”

You Got To Roll (II)6610B37-20-1942, ,

Followed by discussion of song’s origins and some of the lyrics, including Lomax asking Edwards why he changed the lyrics for the recording from “white folks” to “baby.” Also about his musician father and his repertoire.

Stagolee6610B47-20-1942, , ,

A song (and in a style) learned from his father.

Stagolee6610B47-20-1942, , ,

A song (and in a style) learned from his father.

Just A Spoonful6610B57-20-1942, , ,

A song (and in a style) learned from his father.

I Love My Jelly Roll6611A17-20-1942,

A song learned from a Ringling Bros. show: “a shine thing, a negro thing.”

Interview about Edwards' interest in music, his music-making father, and sinful music6611A27-20-1942

Discusses his father joining the church and quitting music; a chord demonstration; and the blues as the Devil’s music.

Hellatakin' Blues6611A37-20-1942Hesitation Blues,

Edwards sings this as “Hellatakin’,” and it’s cataloged as such on AFS card.

Interview about church-going, learning to play, and playing for dances6611A47-20-1942
Interview about traveling, playing dances,6611B7-20-1942

Talk on his travels as an itinerant musician, the dances he played, the musicians he played with (particularly in Memphis), various intoxicants, writing and recording blues. Discusses Bluebird Records and its talent scouts specifically, songwriting and songwriting/sales royalties vs. flat fees. Conversation continues about his preference for the North, and for integration. “Where you can be treated like a man,” Lomax said. More on country dances, dances, how much whiskey he’s drunk.

Worried Life Blues6612A17-20-1942,

Followed by discussion of composing vs. improvising verses.

Water Coast Blues6612A27-20-1942,

Preceded by several false starts and much blank disc.

The Army Blues6612B17-20-1942, ,

Followed by discussion of the song, which he had written “about three weeks ago,” and the war.

Tear It Down6612B27-20-1942Tear It Down (Bed Slats and All),

The item identified as “Ragtime Selection” in the AFS catalog (6612B3) is presumably this one.

Near the Cross6612B4, 7-20-1942

“Bemford’s” surname is not given, nor are the fourth and fifth members of the group. Johnson is identified as the “President of the Quartet [sic].”

Tossed and Driven6612B5, , , , 7-20-1942I'm Trying to Make Heaven My Home; I've Heard of a City Called Heaven

“Bemford’s” surname is not given, nor are the fourth and fifth members of the group. Johnson is identified as the “President of the Quartet [sic].”

There's No Grave Can Hold My Body Down6613A1, , , , 7-20-1942

Followed by plea for upright conduct. “Bemford’s” surname is not given, nor are the fourth and fifth members of the group. Johnson is identified as the “President of the Quartet [sic].”

Speech6613A27-20-1942

Johnson makes a plea for brotherhood and upright conduct.

Get Away, Jordan6613A3, 7-20-1942Wasn't That A Mighty Day

“Bemford’s” surname is not given, nor are the fourth and fifth members of the group. Johnson is identified as the “President of the Quartet [sic].”

Recitation (I Believe the Good Old Bible From the Beginning to the End)6613A47-20-1942

Speaker is identified as the second tenor of the group.

I Thank the Lord I'm In His Care6613A5, , , , 7-20-1942In My Savior's Care

“Bemford’s” surname is not given, nor are the fourth and fifth members of the group. Johnson is identified as the “President of the Quartet [sic].” Followed by largely indecipherable discussion off mic.

Toasts, folk tale, and interview (part 1)6614A7-22-1942

Title given is that on AFS card. Lomax and Edwards trade toasts from 10:30.

Identified by Lomax as the Delta Tourist Camp (suggested by Chris Smith to be the Delta Tourist Courts • 1600 N. State St. in Clarksdale)

Disc skips heavily for first six minutes.

toasts, folk tale, and interview (part 2)6614B7-22-1942

Title given is that on AFS card. Largely an interview about catching trains, hobo musicians, and itinerancy. Lomax and Edwards discuss blues lyrics about rambling, being lonesome, and the “crossroads.” Ends with a Titanic toast.

Identified by Lomax as the Delta Tourist Camp (suggested by Chris Smith to be the Delta Tourist Courts • 1600 N. State St. in Clarksdale)

Stories of a conjure man and blue-gummed people / Toast6615A17-22-1942, ,

Discussion of a conjuror (“conjur man”) named Uncle Tom; recitation of a dirty toast learned from a man from St. Louis; and talk on blue-gummed people.

Do You Want A Little Bit of This?6615A27-22-1942,

Followed by discussion of the song and adolescent sexuality.

Identified by Lomax as the Delta Tourist Camp (suggested by Chris Smith to be the Delta Tourist Courts • 1600 N. State St. in Clarksdale)

Test (Unidentified blues)6615B17-22-1942, , , ,

Identified as “test” on AFS card. Aural evidence suggests this could be Edwards’ performance that appears in Lomax’s Clarksdale film footage.

Marred by intense speed fluctuations.

Wind Howlin' Blues6615B27-22-1942, ,

Identified by Lomax as the Delta Tourist Camp (suggested by Chris Smith to be the Delta Tourist Courts • 1600 N. State St. in Clarksdale)

Roamin' and Ramblin Blues6615B37-22-1942, , , ,

Preceded by Lomax announcement of “a man who’s been all over the country, he’s a very experienced musician, same age as I am — 27 years old….”

At the Cross6616A1, , , , , 7-23-1942,

Individuals listed are those clergy/congregants notated by Lomax.

Recorded at the Mississippi Missionary Baptist Convention at the First African Baptist Church

Scripture lesson6616A27-23-1942

Rev. Brown is announced as being from Brookhaven, Miss.

When I Can Read My Title Clear (part 1)6616A3, , , , , 7-23-1942

Identified on AFS card as “When I Can Read My Promise Clear.” Individuals listed are those clergy/congregants notated by Lomax.

Recorded at the Mississippi Missionary Baptist Convention at the First African Baptist Church

Prayer6616A47-23-1942

Rev. Davis is announced as being from McComb, Miss., on 6612A2.

Sermon6616B17-23-1942

Severe speed fluctuation for first minute.

I'll Fly Away6616B2, , , , , 7-23-1942,

Individuals listed are those clergy/congregants notated by Lomax.

Recorded at the Mississippi Missionary Baptist Convention at the First African Baptist Church

Prayer after the sermon (part 1)6616B37-23-1942

Identified on AFS card as “Commencement of Prayer” (originally 6616B2); title given is drawn from first band on next disc as they’re of a piece. Whiting was identified as being from Greenwood, Miss.

Prayer after the sermon (part 2)6617A17-23-1942

Identified on AFS card as “Commencement of Prayer” (originally 6616B2); title given is drawn from first band on next disc as they’re of a piece. Whiting was identified as being from Greenwood, Miss.

Recorded at the Mississippi Missionary Baptist Convention at the First African Baptist Church.

Take My Hand, Precious Lord, Lead Me On6617A2, , , , , 7-23-1942,

Individuals listed are those clergy/congregants notated by Lomax.

Recorded at the Mississippi Missionary Baptist Convention at the First African Baptist Church

Severe speed fluctuation.

Announcement of recording6617A37-23-1942

Announcement of recordings being made the following day at Nelson Funeral Home, next door to the church.

Severe speed fluctuation.

Sermon on "Kingdom Unity" (part 1)6617A47-23-1942,

The subject of Rev. Richardson’s talk is “Kingdom Unity.”

Severe speed fluctuation.

Sermon on "Kingdom Unity" (part 2)6617B7-23-1942,

The subject of Rev. Richardson’s talk is “Kingdom Unity.”

Recorded at the Mississippi Missionary Baptist Convention at the First African Baptist Church

Sermon on "Kingdom Unity" (part 3)6618A27-23-1942,

The subject of Rev. Richardson’s talk is “Kingdom Unity.”

Recorded at the Mississippi Missionary Baptist Convention at the First African Baptist Church

Prayer6618A27-23-1942

Peaks (?) is announced at the top of the band.

Recorded at the Mississippi Missionary Baptist Convention at the First African Baptist Church

Just A Little Talk With Jesus6618A3, , , , , 7-23-1942, ,

Individuals listed are those clergy/congregants notated by Lomax.

Sermon on foot-washing (part 2)6618B17-23-1942,

Identified on AFS card as “Fragment Of Talk.” Speaker is identified in announcement after his talk as Dr. Jones.

Recorded at the Mississippi Missionary Baptist Convention at the First African Baptist Church

Announcements6618B27-23-1942
Go Preach My Gospel, Saith the Lord6618B3, 7-23-1942,

The songleader is announced at the beginning of the band as what sounds like “Rev. Gray.”

Missionary prayer6619A1, 7-23-1942,

Recorded at the Mississippi Missionary Baptist Convention at the First African Baptist Church

Missionary sermon (part 1)6619A27-23-1942,

Rev. Terrell was from Greenwood, Miss.

Recorded at the Mississippi Missionary Baptist Convention at the First African Baptist Church

Missionary sermon (part 2)6619B17-23-1942,

Rev. Terrell was from Greenwood, Miss.

Missionary sermon (part 3)6619B27-23-1942,

Rev. Terrell was from Greenwood, Miss.

Recorded at the Mississippi Missionary Baptist Convention at the First African Baptist Church

Missionary sermon (part 4)6620A7-23-1942,

Rev. Terrell was from Greenwood, Miss.

Missionary sermon (conclusion)6620B17-23-1942,

Rev. Terrell was from Greenwood, Miss.

Closing prayer6620B27-23-1942, http://[Last portion Y!]/
Closing prayer (fragment)6621A17-23-1942,

A fragment of the closing prayer on 6620B2.

Identified as “tests” on AFS card.

Ambience6621A27-23-1942

Identified as “tests” on AFS card.

Announcement/Prayer (fragment)6621A3, 7-23-1942,

Announcements of forthcoming speakers and the report from the secretary and treasurer. “Cooney” might be Cuney.

Identified as “tests” on AFS card.

[Blank]6621A4

Blank disc with some machine hum.

Just A Closer Walk With Thee6621A57-23-1942,

Rev. Martin gives his address, and Lomax announces that the song was sung from page two of the National Baptist Song Special, printed by the Goodwill Singers, Nashville.

Crying Holy Unto the Lord (Woe Unto Your Soul)6621A67-23-1942,
Hold the Wind (#1)6621B17-23-1942,
Hold the Wind (#2)6621B27-23-1942,

Followed by discussion of his learning the song, its religious connotations, and its origins.

Interview about sacred songwriting and old-time reels and songs6622A1, 7-23-1942

Discussion of songwriting and inspirations. Interspersed with sung example of “Precious Lord, Stand By Me.” Haffer discusses singing reels for candy-knockings, corn-shucking, and dances. Stagolee and Frankie and Johnny are mentioned.

Interview about old-time reels and levee camps6622A2, 7-23-1942

Continued from previous band – Liza Jane, Bill Bailey, Shortenin’ Bread, and a levee-camp holler are mentioned. “Back in the ’90s.” Discussion on levee camps, bad men, and sinfulness follows.

SC to -0.84 / 95.2%

Interview about sinful instruments; levee camp incidents; work songs; old-time dances and reels; banjos, guitars, and tent shows.6622B, 7-23-1942

Recollection of the piano being seen as a sinful instrument; congregants saying the church was being turned into a barrelhouse. Lomax asks about incidents on the levee camp, prompts Haffer with question about cocaine – he recites Take A Whiff On Me, and discusses the distribution of bad-man songs among the general population. Continues with discussion road-gang and timber songs. Haffer sings fragment of John Henry. Recollections of old-time square dances with fiddle and French harp (harmonica) and “calling figures.” Lomax prompts his memory with ballads like Barbara Allen and the Gallows Pole; Haffer says he recalls Casey Jones, but hums a fragment of Casey Bill instead. Haffer recites Birmingham Jail/Bird In A Cage, which he says was his favorite song. Discussion moves to banjos, tent shows, “floating palaces,” and changing musical tastes and repertoires. Talks about Joe Turner and the popularity of the song about him, played on guitar, dating it around 1900. With Lomax’s suggestion, he says Make Me A Pallet On the Floor and Alabama Bound were contemporaneous, and that the guitar eclipsed the banjo in popularity. “They thought they was progressing.”

These Days Got Everybody Troubled6623A7-23-1942

A song concerning the Second World War and national defense. Preceded and followed by discussion of his topical songwriting.

Interview about geopolitics and race relations6623B1, 7-23-1942
The Natchez Theater Fire Disaster6623B27-23-1942

Followed by discussion of the song, its publication, and dissemination, and Haffer’s intentions as a songwriter. “To warn the people – the uncoverted.” Brief talk on damnation and other disaster songs. Sings brief fragment of topical piece, “Storm of ’42” (see 6624A1).

What A Storm (Storm of '42)6624A17-23-1942

Introduces song with details of the storm, which stuck on March 16, 1942. Identified on AFS card as “Song of the Great Disaster.” Haffer says, on AFS 6626A3, that he’d written the song for the state Baptist convention.

I'll Be Glad to See the Son When He Comes (conclusion)6624A27-23-1942

Introduced with remarks on the second coming.

I'll Be Glad to See the Son When He Comes (conclusion)6624A37-23-1942

Not identified as separate band on AFS card.

Where Shall I Be When the First Trumpet Sounds6624B1, 7-23-1942

Followed by discussion of the song. Rev. Martin was from Christian Springs, MIss.; Ms. Johns was from Alligator, Miss.

Motherless Children6624B2, 7-23-1942

A fragment sung at Lomax’s request. Does not appear in AFS catalog.

I'm Going Home On the Morning Train6624B3, 7-23-1942Get Right Church
A Charge to Keep I Have6624B4, , 7-23-1942, ,
Discussion of funeral customs6625A17-23-1942

Continued on 6625B2.

Disc begins too fast, slows down to appropriate pitch by band’s end, when Lomax says he needs to get his “machine going a little better.”

Sermon on Job6625A27-23-1942,

SC to -0.72 / 95.9%

Shine On Me6625B1, 7-23-1942, ,

Identified as “Must Jesus Bear the Cross Alone” on AFS card. Two performances interspersed by discussion of varieties of Watts metered hymns – common, short, fast.

Discussion of funeral customs (continued)6625B27-23-1942

Continued from 6625A1.

Internal speed fluctuation.

Interview about songwriting and song-peddling6626A1, 7-23-1942

Discussion of race relations, peddling songs and newspapers, and his topical songwriting – in particular his ballad about the Titanic, which sold several thousand copies.

The Titanic6626A27-23-1942
Strange Things Happening In the Land6626A37-23-1942

Followed by discussion of songwriting.

[Blank]6626B1

Blank disc with some machine hum.

Tent-show monologue6626B27-23-1942

Orr recites a monologue from a tent show in which he performed. Identified as “opening routine in show” on AFS card. The section on the preacher and the bear was issued under that name on “The Land Where the Blues Began,” Rounder CD 1861, 2002.

The Ugliest Animal, the Baboon6626B37-23-1942, ,
Big Mosquitos6626B47-23-1942, ,
The Man Who Walked On the Water Like Christ6626B57-23-1942, ,
The White Doctor and His Servant6626B67-23-1942, ,
John (Jack) Guesses What's Under the Pot6627A27-23-1942, ,

Preceded by explanation of previous story. Buck Asa identifies the protagonist as both John and Jack.

John and the Lord6627A37-23-1942,
The Preacher and His Hogs (part 1)6627A47-23-1942,
The Preacher and His Hogs (part 2)6627B17-23-1942,
Discussion of the Swift Peter (the dog killer)6627B27-23-1942

Buck Asa briefly discusses the dog-killing “Swift Peter” with Lomax and Lewis Jones, the latter of whom asks if he’s familiar with the “axe man,” but the machine is stopped.

The Preacher Who Could Always Be Trapped By Pussy6627B37-23-1942, ,
The Woman Who Couldn't Count6627B47-23-1942, ,
The Lady and Her Three Daughters6627B57-23-1942, ,
Bring Me My Duck6627B67-23-1942, ,

Disc cuts out before the story ends.

Ramblin' Kid Blues (fragment)6628A1, , , 7-24-1942, , ,

Fragmentary machine/microphone test.

White Man, Jew, and a Negro Go to Heaven6628A27-23-1942, ,
The Ox and the Mule6628A37-23-1942, ,
The Jew and the Irishman at the Cemetery6628A47-23-1942, ,

Lewis Jones wonders aloud how the joke “made it down here.”

[Blank]6628A5
Ramblin' Kid Blues (fragment)6628A6, , , 7-24-1942, , ,
Rosalie6628A7, , , 7-24-1942Rosa Lee, , ,
Joe Turner Blues6628A8, , , 7-24-1942, , ,

With spoken interjections by the rest of the group.

G on pitch pipe6628A97-24-1942
Pearlie May Blues6628B1, , , 7-24-1942, , ,
Take A Walk With Me6628B2, 7-24-1942,
Burr Clover Blues6628B3, 7-24-1942,

Discussion about composition follows. Morganfield says he wrote it in ’40.

[Blank]6629A1
[Blank]6629A2
I Be Bound to Write to You (#1)6629A3, 7-24-1942,
I Be Bound to Write to You (#2)6629A4, 7-24-1942,
You Gonna Miss Me When I'm Gone6629A57-24-1942,
Cornfield holler (#1)6629A67-24-1942
G on pitch pipe6629A77-24-1942
[Blank]6629B17-24-1942
[Blank]6629B27-24-1942
Machine ambience6629B37-24-1942

Hum and other tape-machine ambience.

Cornfield holler (#2)6629B47-24-1942

Followed by discussion about song, which he learned from his brother. End is compromised by disc noise.

Joe Turner Blues (false start)6629B5, 7-24-1942, ,
Joe Turner Blues6629B6, 7-24-1942, ,
Three Suitors Who Were Fast Men6630A17-25-1942, ,
The Foolish Boy and the Preachers6630A27-25-1942, , ,
Greensnake6630A37-25-1942, ,
Interview about storytelling, his biography, Bud Doggett, and tough guys6630A4, 7-25-1942,

Discussion of learning the preceding story from a Walter Hutton, storytelling style, his own biography, the late plantation manager Bud Doggett, tough guys (including a Jack Devil).

[Blank]6631A17-25-1942,

The LC Recording Lab identifies four separate bands before the music begins on this disc side. They are here condensed into one for the purposes of this catalog.

Mr. Bear and Mr. Rabbit (#1)6631A27-25-1942, ,
Mr. Bear and Mr. Rabbit (#2)6631A37-25-1942, ,

Followed by discussion of animal stories.

Three Sons Look for Their Fortune6631A47-25-1942, ,
The Woman Who Never Had No Man6631A57-25-1942, ,
Get Up In the Morning Soon (fragment)6631A67-25-1942Keep My Skillet Good and Greasy, ,
Get Up In the Morning Soon6631A77-25-1942, ,
Casey Jones6631A87-25-1942, ,
Levee camp song (#1)6631B17-25-1942,
Toast on Mr. Chatmon and Bud Doggett6631B27-25-1942, ,

Identified as “Toast on Bud Doggett,” but the toast – which Starks attributes to Howard Spann – has more to do with a Mr. Chatmon’s breaking up moonshining operations.

The Preacher and the Deacon's Wife6631B37-25-1942, ,
Levee camp song (#2)6631B47-25-1942,
Levee camp song (#3)6631B57-25-1942,
The Devil Counts Souls In the Graveyard6631B67-25-1942, ,
[Blank]6632A17-25-1942,
Man Runs Away from the Gunshot6632A27-25-1942, , ,

SC to -0.75 / 95.9%

The Lawyer, the Bookkeeper, and the Tramp Go to Mary6632A37-25-1942, , ,

SC to -0.75 / 95.9%

The Chicken Stealin' Man6632A47-25-1942, , ,

SC to -0.75 / 95.9%

[Blank]6632A57-25-1942,
[Blank]6632A67-25-1942,
The Queen of Africa (#1)6632A77-25-1942, , ,

Possibly so entitled to obscure the bawdy content – there is no mention of Africa in the story.

SC to -0.75 / 95.9%

Shine and the Titanic (#1)6632A87-25-1942, ,

SC to -0.75 / 95.9%

[Blank]6632A97-25-1942,

The LC Recording Lab identifies three separate bands concluding this disc side. They are here condensed into one for the purposes of this catalog.

The Queen of Africa (#2)6632B17-25-1942, , ,

Possibly so entitled to obscure the bawdy content – there is no mention of Africa in the story.

SC to -0.75 / 95.9%

Shine and the Titanic (#2)6632B27-25-1942, ,

Following the recitation, King gives his age as 28 and says he lives nearby.

SC to -0.75 / 95.9%

[Blank]6632B37-25-1942,
Toast about preachers6632B47-25-1942, ,

Identified on AFS card as “Preacher and the Lady.”

SC to -0.75 / 95.9%

The Railroad Men Go to Town6632B57-25-1942, , ,

SC to -0.75 / 95.9%

The Animals Have A Convention6632B67-25-1942, , ,

SC to -0.75 / 95.9%

The Lady Washing at the Spring6632B77-25-1942, , ,

SC to -0.75 / 95.9%

Stewball6632B87-25-1942Skewball,

Lomax volunteers verses that Starks doesn’t know. Followed by discussion of his father singing and fiddling the song; Lomax fishes for “Barbara Allen” and “Frankie and Albert.”

SC to -0.75 / 95.9%

Frankie and Albert (#1)6633A17-25-1942,

Starks says he learned this on a sawmill job in 1910.

SC to -0.76 / 95.6%

Frankie and Albert (#2)6633A27-25-1942,
[Blank]6633A37-26-1942

Badly cut grooves.

Where I Shall Wear the Golden Crown6633A4, 7-26-1942, , ,
Opening prayer6633A5, 7-26-1942,

The congregation moans and shouts responses while Rev. McGhee offers the prayer.

Do Remember Me6633B1, 7-26-1942, ,
Preaching / Bible reading (Hebrews 13:12)6633B2, 7-26-1942
I'll Live On / Testimony6633B3, 7-26-1942, ,

Interspersed with an unidentified woman’s testimony.

Testimonies6633B4, 7-26-1942
I'm Pressing On6633B5, 7-26-1942, , ,
Testimony6633B6, 7-26-1942
Every Hour I'm With You / Testimonies6633B7, , 7-26-1942, ,
Jesus Is My Friend6633B8, 7-26-1942, ,
With Angels Climbing the Golden Stairs6633B9, 7-26-1942, , ,
I Got A New World In My View6634A1, , 7-26-1942, ,

Identified on card as “I Got A Heaven In My View.”

Severe speed fluctuation.

 

Testimony6634A27-26-1942

Severe speed fluctuation.

I Got A Heaven In My View6634A3, 7-26-1942, ,

Severe speed fluctuation.

If You Put Your Trust In Jesus, Everything Will Be All Right6634A4, 7-26-1942, , ,

Severe speed fluctuation.

 

Testimony6634A5, 7-26-1942

Severe speed fluctuation.

Sermon6634A6, 7-26-1942

Speaker is unindentified past his being a visiting pastor.

Severe speed fluctuation.

[Blank]6634B17-26-1942
[Blank]6634B27-26-1942
Sacramental sermon6634B3, 7-26-1942

Combined of six separate fragmentary bands.

At the Cross6634B4, 7-26-1942, ,
Yea, Lord (part 1)6634B5, 7-26-1942, ,
Yea, Lord (part 2)6635A1, 7-26-1942, ,
Sacramental text6635A2, 7-26-1942

Identified as such on AFS card. Used here to differentiate it from 6634A6, “Sacramental sermon.”

The Blood Has Made Me Whole6635A3, 7-26-1942, , ,

Identified as “The Blood Have Made Me Whole” on AFS card.

[Blank]6635B17-26-1942
Prayer6635B2, 7-26-1942
Yea, Lord6635B3, 7-26-1942, , Y/
Praise Him6635B4, 7-26-1942, , Y/
I'm Running for My Life6635B5, 7-26-1942, ,

Fragment at top of track is likely a transfer false start.

Sermon on foot-washing (part 1)6635B6, 7-26-1942
Sermon on foot-washing (part 2)6636A1, 7-26-1942

Remarks by an unidentified elder follow Rev. McGhee’s sermon.

He Never Said A Mumbling Word6636A2, 7-26-1942, , , ,

Followed by ambience and machine hum.

Y/
Sweeter As the Years Go By6636A3, 7-26-1942, , , ,

Identified as “Peter, As the Years Go By” on AFS card.

Machine hum toward band end.

Heaven's Going to Be My Home6636B1, 7-26-1942, , , ,

Marred by speed fluctuation and machine noise.

Just Like Heaven to Me6636B2, 7-26-1942, , ,

Preceded by a minute of blank disc.

Y/
Running Up the Shiny Way6636B3, 7-26-1942, , , ,
I'm A Soldier In the Army of the Lord6637A1, 7-26-1942, , , ,
Worship service: lighting the offering6637A2, 7-26-1942

Identified as “Lighting the offering” in AFS catalog. Ambience includes sounds of worshipper “getting happy” and a guitar strumming.

I Claim Jesus First of All6637A3, 7-26-1942, , , ,

Identified as “Every Little Talk With Jesus Makes It Right” in AFS catalog.

Y/
Just A Little Talk With Jesus6637A4, 7-26-1942, , , , http://Y (fades out)/
Jesus Is My Everything (part 1)6637B1, 7-26-1942, , , ,
Jesus Is My Everything (part 2)6637B2, 7-26-1942, , , ,
Just A Closer Walk With Thee6637B3, 7-25-1942, ,
Until I Found the Lord6637B4, 7-25-1942, ,
The Usher6637B57-25-1942

A recitation of a paean to church ushers. (It sounds like “Dunbar” is credited with the poem in the introduction, but it is not a P.L. Dunbar composition.)

Sending Up My Timber6637B6, 7-25-1942, ,

Partial performance.

You Just Sing for Jesus6638A1, 7-25-1942

[Skip at 1:20]

My Lawd So High You Can't Go Over Him6638A2, , 7-25-1942You Must Come in at the Door

Title given is that on AFS card.

[Beginning marred by skips/]

Walk Around (fragment)6638A3, , 7-25-1942
Please Don't Drive Me Away6638A4, , , 7-25-1942
[Blank]6638B17-26-1942
Christ My Lord Is Coming Soon6638B2, , 7-25-1942http://YES AMAZING/
Jesus Knows6638B3, 7-25-1942, ,
Precious Lord6639A1, 7-25-1942,
I'm Toiling, Lord (#1)6639A2, , 7-25-1942

Identified on AFS card as “Through the Years We Keep On Toiling.” Another take recorded presumably after audience program on 6640A3.

Holy Baby6639A3, , 7-25-1942,

Introduction by (presumably) the quartet’s leader Baker T. Garner, noting the song as a request and calling it the “hardest song that ever was, nearly.”

Ain't No Grave Can Hold My Body Down6639B1, 7-25-1942
When I've Done the Best I Can, I Want My Crown6639B2, 7-25-1942
There's A King of Kings Somewhere6640A1, 7-25-1942, ,
A Charge to Keep I Have6640A2, , 7-25-1942,
I'm Toiling, Lord (#2)6640A3, , 7-25-1942
My Mind Done Changed (#1)6640B17-28-1942, ,

Followed by discussion of where he learned song and its meaning.

Two minutes of blank disc precede performance.

Katy, I Got To Go (To Judgment)6640B27-28-1942, ,

Followed by discussion of song, sung at old-time Baptist prayer meetings.

Rock, Daniel (#1)6640B37-28-1942,

Followed by discussion of shouting.

Rock, Daniel (#2)6641A17-28-1942, ,

Preceded by empty disc and brief announcement of Robertson’s age (75). This performance is not listed in the AFS catalog, which identifies the following song as 6641A1.

Run, Sinner, Run6641A27-28-1942, ,
There'll Be Preaching Tonight (On the Old Campground)6641A37-28-1942, ,
Outshine the Sun6641A47-28-1942Beulah Land, ,
On the Other Side of Jordan6641A57-28-1942, ,

Sound is severely intermittent.

The Chariot Jubilee6641A67-28-1942,
The Band In Gideon6641A77-28-1942,

Followed by discussion of song’s origins and setting, and shouts.

Hallelujah!6641A87-28-1942,

Title is that given by Robertson following song. Refrain: “When the war shall be ended / I’m a soldier of the cross.”

Keep Inching Along6641A9, 7-28-1942,
Tell Me How Long Has the Train Been Gone6641B17-28-1942

Followed by discussion of song and its composition (by Robertson).

Discussion of coon songs6641B27-28-1942

A separate band on the disc, although not identified as one in AFS cards. Brief discussion of his coon-song repertoire and Lomax’s explanation that the discs aren’t being created for broadcast but for study.

Make Cindy Behave Herself6641B37-28-1942

Identified as “Cindy” on AFS card (and likely by Robertson). [See Lomax’s 1959 recording of Sid Hemphill’s “Make Lula Behave Herself” for an ancillary.]

Discussion of square dance tunes and calls6641B47-28-1942
That's What's the Matter With the Church Today6642A17-28-1942,
Clear the Line Before You Call6642A27-28-1942,
My Mind Done Changed (#2)6642A37-28-1942,
Discussion of getting religion; sinful habits; playing music, gambling, and fights at dances.6642A47-28-1942

Robertson recounts his sinful behavior before “finding holiness,” and playing music with his band at the house at the Hill plantation. Discussion of differences between white and black dances; gambling, fights, and music at both. Trouble (“shooting spree”) he got into in St. Louis.

Hard Time in Blue Eagle Jail6642B17-28-1942

Robertson said this was “made up on the railroad.”

John Henry6642B27-28-1942

Lomax asks for other railroad songs; Robertson recites a fragment of John Henry and hums the melody.

Talk on recording / machine set-up6642B3, 7-28-1942

Lomax and Williams discuss what she’s going to sing; he cautions against walking across the floor while the disc is being cut.

Don't Care Where You Bury My Body6642B47-28-1942

Ms. Williams says she learned the song from her grandmother. She sings a fragment of “Glory, Glory, Hallelujah” that she heard from her. Discusses hearing her first hymn, “Am I Born to Die,” at age five from her aunt.

Interview about Don't Care Where You Bury My Body / Glory, Glory, Hallelujah6642B5, 7-28-1942, ,
Am I Born to Die6642B67-28-1942,
Interview about her family singing, praying, and shouting6642B7, 7-28-1942

Ms. Williams discusses the various ways of getting happy and being moved by the spirit. She then addresses some younger visitors, telling them they can come back and perform song ring plays and reels for Lomax and Jones.

There Is A Fountain Filled With Blood6642B87-28-1942,
Interview about Watts hymns (lining hymns), education, and old songs6643A1, 7-28-1942

Ms. Williams discusses her family’s singing – both jubilee and Watts hymns – and her education and that of her children. She sings fragments of “Rock Daniel,” “Chariot’s Coming (Jubilee),” “Mockingbird.”

Free At Last6643A27-28-1942
You Don't Believe I'm A Child of God6643A37-28-1942

The accompanying voices are presumably of her younger family members present.

Don't Grieve After Me6643A47-28-1942
Chicka Ma, Chicka Ma, Caney Crow / Billy Boy6643B17-28-1942,

Brief discussion follows.

Ain't Gonna Rain No More (#1)6643B27-28-1942

Brief discussion follows. Identified on AFS card as “Taint Gonna Rain No Mo’.”

When the Saints Go Marching In6643B37-28-1942
Sunday Morning Band6643B47-28-1942
Never Said A Mumblin' Word6643B57-28-1942
Mary Mack6643B6, , , 7-28-1942, ,

Demonstration of game follows.

I'm A Funny Little Dutch Girl6643B7, , , 7-28-1942, ,

Mason sings the song unaccompanied then demonstrates the game.

Chicka Ma, Chicka Ma, Caney Crow6643B8, , , 7-28-1942, ,
Shortenin' Bread (#1)6644A1, , , 7-28-1942, ,
Mister Frog Went A-Courtin' (#1)6644A2, , , 7-28-1942Froggie Went A-Courtin', ,
Sally Go Round the Sunshine6644A3, , , 7-28-1942, ,
Little Sally Walker6644A4, , , 7-28-1942, ,
Pullin' the Skiff6644A5, , , 7-28-1942, ,
Rock Daniel6644A67-28-1942, ,

First name unknown.

What A Time (Shout for Joy) / Interview about shouting, the sanctified church, and singing at work6644A7, 7-28-1942, ,

Followed by discussion (with John Cameron) about shouting and getting happy in church. Lomax attempts to coax Ms. Williams to talk about the sanctified church, the “new religion,” but she doesn’t recognize it as such. Discussion continues about singing at work and cotton picking.

All Night Long6644B17-28-1942

Ms. Williams tells Lomax this song is a “hally” (hallelujah). “Shout if you want on it. Pat your hands on it.”

Dark Was the Night, Cold Was the Ground6644B2, 7-28-1942,

Others join in halfway through the singing. “Assisted in prayer by Sister Williams,” Cameron jokes at the end.

Satisfy (#1)6644B3, , , , 7-28-1942Satisfied, ,
Frairs Point Victory Song6644B4, , , , 7-28-1942

Presumably the fight song from a local high school.

Ice Cream, Soda Water6644B5, , , , 7-28-1942, ,
Milk, Milk6644B6, , , , 7-28-1942,

Likely other girls are involved who were unidentified. (A Ruby is addressed before the singing.)

Hide and Go Seek6645A1, , , , 7-28-1942,

Identified on AFS card as “Hiding Go Seek.” This band includes several hide-and-seek counting-off rhymes, as well as a “poem” (“Hush Little T-Model, Don’t You Cry). Each of the girls introduces herself before their recitation.

Counting-out rhymes6645A2, , 7-28-1942,

Identified on AFS card as “Hiding Go Seek.” These are counting-off/counting-out rhymes: “Cornbread Rough,” “Engine, Engine Number 9,” “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”

One Potato, Two / Hickory Dickory Dock6645A3, 7-28-1942,

Identified on AFS card as “Hiding Go Seek.”

Come On Boys, Let's Go to Hunting (It Don't Suit Me)6645A4, , , , , 7-28-1942

Followed by explanation of song, and presumably the source, last name Walker. Identified on AFS card as “a local parody” (of “It Just Suits Me”).

Jump, Mister Rabbit6645A5, , , , 7-28-1942,

Title given is that on AFS card. Girls sing “Jump up the rabbit.”

Mister Frog Went A-Courtin' (#2)6645A6, , , , 7-28-1942,
Doctor, Doctor Can You Tell (Mister Frog Went A-Courtin' In a Haystack)6645A7, , , , 7-28-1942,
Satisfy (#2)6645A8, , , , 7-28-1942,
Interview about roustabouting, roustabout songs, and steamboating reminiscences6645B1, 7-28-1942

Includes snippets of several roustabouts’ songs and reminiscences of working on the river, a race between the Katy Adams and Jim Lee, and Friars Point in the steamboat era. “One of the finest towns for a colored person to make his living… if you can make your living here and you don’t bother nobody, and stay in your place, nobody gonna bother you.”

Worried Life Blues6645B2, 7-28-1942,
The Mulberry Bush6646A18-4-1942,

Severe speed fluctiation.

Talk/ambience6646A28-4-1942
Levee camp holler (#2)6646A38-4-1942

Identified on AFS card with first line: “Got Me ‘Cused of ‘Forgin’.” Followed by interview with Lewis Jones about song, which he first heard in a levee camp in Arkansas.

Levee camp (muleskinner) holler6646A48-4-1942

Marred by skips.

Toast (fragment)6646A58-4-1942

Marred by skips.

[Blank]6646B1
Toast (You Shall Be Free) (part 1)6646B28-4-1942
Toast (You Shall Be Free) (part 2)6646B38-4-1942
T.P. Running, Smokestack Drag the Ground6646B48-4-1942
Unidentified holler6646B58-4-1942
Hey, Hey Captain (Levee camp holler) (part 1)6646B68-4-1942Y/
Hey, Hey Captain (Levee camp holler) (part 2)6646B78-4-1942
Levee camp holler (#2)6647A18-4-1942

Followed by extended stretch of blank disc.

Toast on Sonny Simms6647A28-4-1942
Toast on Hitler6647A38-4-1942
Toasts (part 1)6647A4, 8-4-1942

Vulgar toasts, primarily about crab lice (including one on the NRA [National Recovery Act]).

Toasts (part 2)6647A5, 8-4-1942
Unloading steel from cars6647B18-8-1942

Followed by Lomax interview about “chunk[ing] iron” in advance of laying track.

Identified by Lomax as the Delta Tourist Camp (suggested by Chris Smith to be the Delta Tourist Courts • 1600 N. State St. in Clarksdale)

Interview fragment/ambience6647B28-8-1942

Fragment of the preceding interview amidst ambience (including the pouring of a drink and two burps).

Identified by Lomax as the Delta Tourist Camp (suggested by Chris Smith to be the Delta Tourist Courts • 1600 N. State St. in Clarksdale)

Sinking rails and joining iron6647B3, 8-8-1942

Followed by discussion of track-laying.

Identified by Lomax as the Delta Tourist Camp (suggested by Chris Smith to be the Delta Tourist Courts • 1600 N. State St. in Clarksdale)

Spiking down6648A18-8-1942,

Reenactment of spiking railroad ties with fragments of work song and reminiscences about various characters on the crew. Bacon keeps time by striking a tie.

Identified by Lomax as the Delta Tourist Camp (suggested by Chris Smith to be the Delta Tourist Courts • 1600 N. State St. in Clarksdale)

Shuffling/catching ties (#1)6648A2, 8-8-1942, , ,

Reenactment of lining/joining track with assorted work song verses. Bacon keeps time by striking a tie.

Shuffling/catching ties (#2)6648B, 8-8-1942, ,

Reenactment of lining/joining track with assorted work song verses (e.g., “I Got A Bulldog”; “Stewball”). Followed by discussion of the work song “Jumpin’ Julie/Judy.”

Identified by Lomax as the Delta Tourist Camp (suggested by Chris Smith to be the Delta Tourist Courts • 1600 N. State St. in Clarksdale)

Interview about the benefits of whiskey; maintaining at work; negotiating differences in foremen; Bacon's work history6649A, , 8-8-1942

Interviewed by Lewis Jones and Alan Lomax, with some comments by Elias Boykin. After discussing whiskey, bosses, Mexicans on a crew in Kansas, he explains his work history, first on a levee camp (at Wolf River Bottom, Tenn.) and later on the railroad. After getting laid off, he followed musician friends Joe and Buddy Davis into Memphis where he became “a little sheik on gamblin'” before he started following the harvest until 1929. “…a pint of whiskey, and go on home and drink it, and he stay by the fire, that’ll help him. When they fixed it so a man [who] went out in the exposure couldn’t get a whiskey that’s the worst thing they could do. That’s the life of a man, out, you see. When he come in and open the pores of his skin, see. He been out chill all day long, some time he wet, sometime he be in a place he can’t make a fire. Well, out in the exposure, and all that exposure and stuff goin’ in his skin—if he drink him a little whiskey—I don’t mean go and do like some folks, get on the streets and get sloppy drunk and things like that—which, why, you can’t take care of your job if you do that. But just drink a little whiskey, you know, along. That better for him, you see. He’ll live and last and be whole lots more super than a man who don’t never drink no whiskey. You catch a man who don’t never drink no whiskey and be out in the exposure, well, why, he’s always be hurting, or aching, or he can’t halfway pick up or somethin’ all the time. But if he drink him a little whiskey along, it help him. That gives him pep. Nerve.”

Identified by Lomax as the Delta Tourist Camp (suggested by Chris Smith to be the Delta Tourist Courts • 1600 N. State St. in Clarksdale)

Interview about Georgia Skin and gambling / Jack O' Diamonds6649B, , 8-8-1942, ,

Discussion of gambling and hustling cards interspersed with singing of “Jack O’ Diamonds” and assorted floating verses. Band begins with idle guitar picking. Band ends with a woman’s voice: “I wouldn’t let those boys sit on the bed.”

Identified by Lomax as the Delta Tourist Camp (suggested by Chris Smith to be the Delta Tourist Courts • 1600 N. State St. in Clarksdale)

Lining/calling track6650A, 8-8-1942, ,

Reenactment of track-lining with assorted lining-song fragments (some vulgar). Bacon keeps time by striking a tie. Identified as “Lining or calling track” on AFS card, although Bacon and Boykin state at the disc’s end that this is called “calling track… nothin’ but call.”

Identified by Lomax as the Delta Tourist Camp (suggested by Chris Smith to be the Delta Tourist Courts • 1600 N. State St. in Clarksdale)

http://BEAUTIFUL SONGS/
Break the News to Mother (fragment)6650B18-9-1942, , ,
Coon, Coon, Coon (I Wish My Color Would Fade)6650B28-9-1942, , ,

Followed by discussion about learning the song (c. 1914), and its popularity.

Preceded by stretch of blank disc and test segment.

Interview about whites' attitudes towards blacks6650B3, , 8-9-1942

“They’d rather have ignorant niggers; don’t know nothing.” Identified on AFS card as “Attitudes of white people toward Negroes.”

Break the News to Mother6650B48-9-1942, , ,

Followed by discussion about the song, which he learned from a songbook c. 1914. Places it, correctly, in the Spanish-American War.

The State of Arkansas6651A18-9-1942The State of Arkansaw,

Followed by discussion of where he learned it. Identified merely as “Arkansas” on AFS card.

Y/
Interview about his musician father6651A2, 8-9-1942

Discussion of his geneaology – his father’s father was white; his mother was “full-blooded Indian. All the Negro that’s in me is on my mother’s side.” His father was a musician who “could play most any kind of music.”

Talk/ambience6651A38-9-1942
The Late War6651A48-9-1942, ,

Followed by discussion of the song, which he learned in 1918, and the race of song’s composer.

Ollie Jackson (#1)6651B18-9-1942,

Followed by discussion of the song. Learned from a Charley Washington of Kansas City.

Travelin' Man6651B28-9-1942, ,

Followed by a discussion of the song, which he learned at a medicine show.

Fox Hunter's Song6651B38-9-1942

Followed by a discussion of the song, which he learned from his father “about forty years ago.”

Y/
Our Goodman6652A18-9-1942Three Nights Drunk; Three Nights Experience

Preceded by several blank bands and his introduction of the song.

Take A Whiff On Me6652A28-9-1942

Preceded by discussion of cocaine, its effects, and its erstwhile popularlity. “Folks would use it and they get drunk and they couldn’t smell no whiskey!”

Duncan and Brady6652B18-9-1942
Stackerlee6652B28-9-1942Stagolee

Followed by discussion of learning the song and “Duncan and Brady,” which he recalls hearing in 1897 from an Oscar Bramley who sang it while plowing. Starks calls him a “levee-camp man” who learned them in St. Louis.

Interview about riverboats and roustabouts6652B3, 8-9-1942

Recollections of experiences on the river, including sailing from Memphis on the Kate Adams, and the treatment and techniques of roustabouts.

Interview about compulsory labor; freedom of movement; bad men; obeying white folks6653A, 8-9-1942

Discussion of compelling local African Americans (including children) to pick cotton and instances of resistance. Lomax asks about the baddest men in the area; Starks recalls various fights, whoopings, and Bud Doggett. “Mississippi was the best place on earth for a good nigger and the worst place for a bad nigger.” Says his grandmother, a “slavery-time woman,” always taught him to obedient to white folks.

Down On the Farm6653B18-9-1942,

Preceded by fragmentary discussion about whether Starks remembers any blues or “slow drags.”

Y/
Show Me the Way to Go Home6653B28-9-1942,
I'm A Rowdy Soul6653B38-9-1942Whoa Back Buck,

Discussion follows about it being a “po’ white song.”

My Old Mistress Promised Me / Interview about dances and courting6653B48-9-1942,

“Mistress” on AFS card as “Mistis.” Learned from his father. Discussion follows about set dances and courting girls.

Toast (Doodly Doo)6653B58-9-1942,

A vulgar toast Starks recalls learning in jail. Discussion follows about toasts.

I'll Keep My Skillet Greasy If I Can / Old Dog Blue / Sally Goodin6654A18-9-1942Keep My Skillet Good and Greasy,

Followed by discussion of various songs, including “Old Dog Blue” and “Sally Goodin” of which he sings fragments.

The Dummy Line6654A28-9-1942,

Identified on AFS card simply as “The Dummy.” Lomax prompts him with extra verses.

Didn't He Ramble6654A38-9-1942The Derby Ram; The Darby Ram,
Interview about Sheriff Greek Rice outlawing music6654A4, 8-9-1942

Identified on AFS card as “Mr. Greek Rice Outlaws Music.” Discussion of Sheriff Rice closing down the juke joints and barrelhouses.

Story of the rabbit and the buzzard6654B18-9-1942,

Identified on AFS card as “Buzzard Gets Rabbit In A Hollow Log.”

Interview about ghosts6654B2, 8-9-1942,
Ollie Jackson (#2)6654B38-9-1942,
Hop, Brother Rabbit, In the Pea Vine (#1)6655A1, 8-10-1942, ,

“Brother” is rendered “brer” on AFS card. Followed by brief discussion of learning and playing the song. Ms. Smith announces that she’s from Hillhouse, Mississippi. (Unclear whether she announces her middle name as “Ford” or “Forrest.”)

Hop, Brother Rabbit, In the Pea Vine (#2)6655A2, 8-10-1942, ,

“Brother” is rendered “brer” on AFS card. Followed by brief discussion of learning and playing the song. Mrs. Davis announces that she’s from Hillhouse, Mississippi. “Brother” is rendered “brer” on AFS card; standard spelling used here as not all the singers of these separate versions pronounce it “brer.”

Hop, Brother Rabbit, In the Pea Vine (#3)6655A38-10-1942, ,

“Brother” is rendered “brer” on AFS card.

Hop, Brother Rabbit, In the Pea Vine (#4)6655A4, 8-10-1942,

“Brother” is rendered “brer” on AFS card. Followed by discussion of learning the song in public school in Coahoma, where she is from, and several short blank bands.

We Go Logy, Logy, Logy6655A5, 8-10-1942,

A variant of the Hokey Pokey. Followed by discussion of learning and playing the song. Miss Hughes was from Jonestown, Miss.

Here Come Two Gents from Holly Springs (#1)6655B1, 8-10-1942,

Followed by singers’ introductions and discussion of where they learned the song.

Bob-A-Needle6655B2, 8-10-1942,

Followed by explanation of game and discussion of learning/teaching it.

Mister Frog Went A Courting6655B3, 8-10-1942Froggie Went A Courting,

Followed by explanation of game and discussion of learning/teaching it.

We're Marching 'Round the Levee6655B48-10-1942,

Zora Neale Hurston sang a very similar variant, “There Stands A Bluebird,” for Lomax in Haiti in late 1936.

Down By the Green Apple Tree6655B58-10-1942,
Who De Cat (Sail, Sail)6655B68-10-1942Who-Li-Can,

See 6657A2 for “Who-Li-Can,” a variant performed by an older generation.

How Many Miles to Bethlehem? (#2)6655B7, , 8-10-1942,

Following the performance Florence identifies herself as 11 years old and living on the “King and Anderson place”; Mabel Lou is 12; her stated residence is indecipherable.

Satisfy (#1)6656A1, 8-10-1942, ,
Satisfy (#2)6656A2, 8-10-1942, ,

Followed by a girl named Louise Hicks introducing herself before singing a version that wasn’t recorded.

Little Sally Walker6656A3, 8-10-1942,

Queen Esther announces that she’s 13 and from Mr. Boland’s [?] place near Clarksdale. Her last name is indistinct, and could be “Harris” (suggested by Chris Smith and census research) or “Ivey.” She explains how the game is played.

Uncle John's Rabbit6656A4, 8-10-1942, ,
Here Come Two Gents from Holly Springs (#2)6656A5, 8-10-1942,

Followed by explanation of the game.

Here We Go Loop-Ti-Loop6656A6, , 8-10-1942,

Followed by explanation of the game.

All Hid (#1)6656B18-10-1942,
All Hid (#9)6656B10, 8-10-1942,

A mixed group responds. (This group likely is that which appears in the film footage.)

Little Girls, Little Girls (#1)6656B11, 8-10-1942,

A mixed group responds. (This group likely is that which appears in the film footage. Includes Mrs. E.M. Davis.)

Little Girls, Little Girls (#2)6656B12, 8-10-1942, ,

A mixed group responds. (This group likely is that which appears in the film footage.)

Y Girls Are High-Minded6656B138-10-1942,

“Y” as in YWCA. (This group likely is that which appears in the film footage.)

Shortenin' Bread (#1)6656B148-10-1942,

Bobbie Mae says she’s eight and that she learned the song from her teacher. Lomax asks what her favorite song is; she replies “Shortenin’ Bread?” AFS card misidentifies singer as Bill J. Lewis [sic], confusing Billie J. Levi on 6656B7.

Y/
All Hid (#2)6656B28-10-1942,

Rembert announces that she’s 11 and from King and Anderson Plantation.

All Hid (#3)6656B38-10-1942,

Queen Esther announces that she’s 13 and from Mr. Boland’s [?] place near Clarksdale. Her last name is indistinct, and could be “Harris” (suggested by Chris Smith and census research) or “Ivey.” She explains how the game is played.

All Hid (#3)6656B38-10-1942,

Queen Esther announces that she’s 13 and from Mr. Boland’s [?] place near Clarksdale. Her last name is indistinct, and could be “Harris” (suggested by Chris Smith and census research) or “Ivey.” She explains how the game is played.

All Hid (#4)6656B48-10-1942,

Ora B. announces that she’s 14 and from King and Anderson Plantation.

All Hid (#4)6656B58-10-1942,

Virginia Lee announces that she’s 13 and from King and Anderson Plantation.

All Hid (#5)6656B68-10-1942,

Louise announces that she’s 13 and from “Mr. Peacock’s place.”

All Hid (#6)6656B78-10-1942,

Billie J. announces that she’s 9 and from King and Anderson Plantation.

All Hid (#7)6656B88-10-1942,

Lee announces that she’s 11 and from Clarksdale.

All Hid (#8)6656B9, 8-10-1942,

A mixed group responds. (This group likely is that which appears in the film footage. Includes Mrs. E.M. Davis.)

All Hid (#10)6657A1, 8-11-1942,
Sally Go Round the Sunshine6657A10, 8-11-1942,
Who-Li-Can (Sail, Sail)6657A2, 8-11-1942Who De Cat,

See 6655B6 for “Who De Cat,” a variant performed by younger generation.

Aunt Dinah's Dead (#1)6657A3, 8-11-1942,
Di Dee-O6657A4, 8-11-1942,

Followed by explanation of game, which Ms. Harris recalls learning at the Gregory School near Lyon, Miss.

Shortenin' Bread (#2)6657A5, 8-11-1942, ,

(Unclear whether she announces her middle name as “Ford” or “Forrest.”)

Green Gravel6657A68-11-1942,
All the Way Round (Seven Times)6657A7, 8-11-1942,

Followed by explanation of the game and her learning it about 25 years earlier at the Gregory School near Lyon, Miss., where the children who played it were between 10 and 16.

How Many Miles to Bethlehem? (#2)6657A88-11-1942,

Identified as “teacher and group [sic]” on AFS card.

Lost My Handkerchief Yesterday6657A9, 8-11-1942,

Followed by explanation of the game and appropriate ages for playing it.

Willie Over the Water6657B1, 8-11-1942,

Ms. Shelby says she lives in Friars Point, and learned this song 25 years earlier. She then explains the game.

Needle Eye6657B2, 8-11-1942,

Followed by explanation of game, which Ms. Harris recalls learning at the Gregory School near Lyon, Miss.

Shoo Fly6657B3, 8-11-1942,

Followed by explanation of game, which Ms. Harris has known for 30 years.

Cool Water6657B48-11-1942,
Chicken, My Chicken, My Craney Crow (#1)6657B5, 8-11-1942,

Identified on AFS Card as “Chicken-Ma-Craney-Crow.” Followed by explanation of game.

Did You Ever See the Monkey Do the Motion6657B6, 8-11-1942,

Followed by discussion of learning the game and some inaudible chatter.

Chicken, My Chicken, My Craney Crow (#2)6657B7, 8-11-1942,

Identified on AFS Card as “Chicken-Ma-Craney-Crow.” Followed by explanation of game.

Aunt Dinah's Dead (#2)6657B8, 8-11-1942, ,
Guessing games6657B98-11-1942,
If I Be Lifted Up6658A7-24-1942, , ,

Recorded at the Mississippi Missionary Baptist Convention at the First African Baptist Church

Where Could I Go But to the Lord6659A, 7-24-1942, , ,

Identified on AFS card as “Where Shall I Go.”

Every Time I Feel the Spirit6659B17-24-1942, , ,
There's No Hiding Place Down Here6659B27-24-1942, , ,
Piano solo6660A17-24-1942,
Wait A Little While6660A2, , , , Y/
Unidentified hymn6660B17-24-1942, , ,
Hallelujah, Amen6660B27-24-1942, , ,
Does Anybody Know My Lord6660B37-24-1942, , ,

 

I Know I've Been Converted6661A1, 7-24-1942, , ,
The Man of Galilee (continued)6661A2, 7-24-1942, , ,

Identified on AFS card by (roughly) first line, “I’m On A Shiny Pathway.”

The Man of Galilee (continued)6661B1, 7-24-1942, , ,

Identified on AFS card by (roughly) first line, “I’m On A Shiny Pathway.”

Jesus Will Be With Me In My Dying Hour6661B27-24-1942, , ,
Fo' Day Blues/Interview6662A1, 7-28-1942, , ,

Interview about Clarksdale, dance halls, local piano players, and this tune takes place while Jones plays. (Despite Alan’s introduction of the date being “the 26th or 27th,” it was the 28th.)

Unidentified ragtime tune (#1)6662A27-28-1942,
Walking Billy/Interview6662B1, 7-28-1942, , ,

Interview about the “Walking Billy” and other dances and tunes; ragtime pianists; and the clientele of the joints where Jones would play takes place while he plays the tune.

Unidentified ragtime tune (#2)6662B2, 7-28-1942, , ,

Followed by interview about ragtime, blues, and assorted dances at the venues he played.

Interview about Clarksdale's red-light district, his jazz band and their tunes6663A1, 7-28-1942, ,

Discussion of closing of Clarksdale’s red-light district and scattering of musicians; his band and its personnel, and their tunes.

Interview about his jazz band and their tunes (continued)6663A2, 7-28-1942, ,

Discussion of his band, its personnel, their tunes, and renowed local musicians.

Interview about early blues6663A3, 7-28-1942,

Discussion of early blues, including Joe Turner Blues (which he recalls as the first blues he heard), Midnight Blues, and Corrina.

Corrina, Corrina/Careless Love/Interview6663B1, 7-28-1942, ,

Interspersed with discussion of early blues.

Love Me6663B27-30-1942,
I Heard the Voice of Jesus Say (#1)6663B3, 7-30-1942,

Identified on AFS card as “four girls.”

I Heard the Voice of Jesus Say (#2)6664A17-30-1942,

Identified on AFS card as “four girls,” although this band consists of two women taking turns singing.

All My Trouble Will Be Over After While6664A27-30-1942

Preceded by discussion of where she learned the song.

All Power Is In His Hands6664B7-30-1942

Followed by brief discussion of the song, which the singer (26 years old) learned from her sister Annie Mae Morris.

Y/
Good Old Man6665A1, 7-30-1942,

Preceded by announcement of where she learned the game and how it’s played.

Satisfy (#1)6665A2, 7-30-1942,

Preceded by announcement of where she learned the game (16-17 years earlier at Hill House, Miss.).

Satisfy (#2)6665A3, 7-30-1942,

Preceded by announcement of where she learned the game (Hill House, Miss., at the Rosewood School).

Satisfy (#3)6665A47-30-1942,
Satisfy (#4)6665A5, 7-30-1942,

Preceded by announcement that Ms. Peterson learned the song at the Rural School in her home of Falcon, Quitman Co., Mississippi.

Go In and Out the Window6665B1, 7-30-1942,
Jump for Joy6665B2, 7-30-1942, ,
To Be Sho' (#1)6665B3, , 7-30-1942, ,

Preceded by introduction of her learning the song at “the old Negro school” east of Lyons, Miss. Identified on AFS card as “Tip A Gho” [sic].

To Be Sho' (#2)6665B4, , 7-30-1942, ,

Identified on AFS card as “Tip A Gho” [sic].

Old Georgia Rabbit6665B5, 7-30-1942, ,

Preceded by introduction of her learning the song at a school at Alligator, Miss.

Ain't Gonna Rain No More (#1)6665B6, 7-30-1942, ,

Ms. Teague announces that she learned this song in junior high school in Davenport, Miss.

Ain't Gonna Rain No More (#1)6666A1, 7-30-1942,

Ms. Harris announces that she learned the song at “the rural school out of Lyon, Miss.”

Band is marred by severe pops.

Sally Pick A Suzy6666A2, 7-30-1942There Stands A Bluebird (Tra La La),

Ms. Rogers announces that she learned the song at Country School in Richmond, Miss. She was superintendent of the Coahoma County Colored Schools.

Band is marred by severe pops and skips.

You Got to Take Sick and Die Some of These Days6666A37-30-1942, http://Source audio from LWO/
Why Don’t You Live So God Can Use You6666B17-30-1942, http://Source audio from LWO/
Country Blues6666B27-30-1942, http://Source audio from LWO/
You Gonna Miss Me When I'm Dead and Gone6667A17-30-1942, http://Source audio from LWO/
Levee Camp Blues (#1)6667A27-30-1942, http://Source audio from LWO/
Interview about Levee Camp Blues (#1)6667A3, 7-30-1942,
Levee Camp Blues (#2)6667B17-30-1942,

Followed by Lomax interview about Forrest Jones’ levee camp in Arkansas.

32-206667B2, 7-30-1942,

“Johnny”‘s is otherwise unidentified.

Rock Me, Shake Me6668A18-11-1942Swing Out on the Golden Gate,

Casey gives his age as 26, and recalling where and from whom he learned the song from (a quartet teacher named Joe Fass in Lula.) Lomax stops tape abruptly upon learning that the song was from a book. Primary title is that on AFS card.

Corrected to -0.80 / 95.45%